Illustration by RJ Matson

Illustration by RJ Matson

Baggage, We All Have It

Forged by past experiences both good and bad, our “baggage” is often what makes us unique and interesting. The same can be said for shelter pets. Many animal rescues and shelters downplay the things that may make an animal a little harder to place. We see these attributes as interesting and worthwhile challenges to overcome or manage through training, patience, and a little love. I guess we just have more faith in our adopters, wonderful compassionate people who understand shelter pets are often going through the most difficult times of their lives and need a little understanding before revealing their best selves.

The following quirky but glorious pets are currently available for adoption.

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Meet “Lola”

Baggage: Lola prefers to live in a single dog home.

The Positives: Lola successfully completed a two-month training course with AbsoluteK9 and is one of the best trained dogs we’ve ever had to place. As part of the package, Lola’s adoptive family will receive free follow-up training classes at AbsoluteK9 in New Hope. This 30 lbs. Harrier Cross is extremely affectionate and completely non-aggressive toward people but does not like other dogs.

 
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Georgia (On My Mind)

Baggage: Timid at first, Georgia will need a patient family who will let her come around in her own time (about two weeks).

The Positives: Georgia loves kids and other dogs. Cathy at Square Dog Ranch has worked with Georgia and enjoys videotaping this 80 lbs. Rottweiler spending time with her young children and the other dogs in her kennel.

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Corey and Topanga

Baggage: Trying to find a home for two siblings together/a bonded pair can prove difficult. And Topanga (the female) prefers male dogs.

The Positives: This pair of 50-60 lbs. Shepherd Mixes are ready-made for a family actively looking for two active dogs!

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Zoe (Our Longest Resident)

Baggage: Zoe stiffens and feels uncomfortable at the dog park with other dogs. We feel Zoe would do best living happily with a homebody and a fenced yard.

The Positives: This dog has never shown any signs of aggression. She’s a “people dog” and will make some lucky family very happy. This 4 y/o Cattle Dog Mix (Zoe is originally from Texas) has been waiting for a family longer than any other dog at 1 Love.

 
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Maggie the Cat

Baggage: Maggie is one of eleven kittens – all competing for homes. In a world of so many homeless cats, where a can of tuna and a whistle out the back door will easily land you a feline friend, finding great/carefully screened homes for Maggie and her sibs could prove challenging.

The Positives: Our cats are tested for Feline AIDS & Leukemia (all neg.), UTD on vaccinations, and will be spayed/neutered when 6 months of age. Maggie’s mom is also available for adoption.

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Adella, Caribbean Queen

Baggage: Adella doesn’t seem to care for other dogs and her adopter will need to be mindful of this when Adella is out and about.

The Positives: Adella is great with people! And she’s a miracle walking. Adella was sent to us from Anguilla, and on an island where puppies are routinely euthanized, it’s a miracle Adella made it to PA (thanks to our rescue partners on the island). Ideal for a jogger or onlead hiking.

 
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Jamie (A Grieving Sister)

Baggage: Jamie is a victim of ageism. Society and a few potential adopters have done her wrong by assuming she’s too old and not pet worthy. Is a Beagle of eight or nine not worthy of a home and a loving family?

The Positives: This Pocket Beagle is beautiful, healthy, and has so much to offer. And the person who adopts this dog is doing a Mitzvah: Jamie arrived at 1 Love with her very sick, much older sister (a Boston Terrier). The dog died of a massive seizure and Jamie still searches for her friend.

Illustration by Lisa Haney

Illustration by Lisa Haney

Puppy Mills: The Factory Farming of Man’s Best Friend

In a two-month period in the summer of 2019, 1 Love 4 Animals rescued over 70 puppy mill dogs from Amish breeding kennels in Pennsylvania. Our volunteers set out with a sense of urgency to help as many dogs as we could as the temperatures reached an all time high. Often the dogs were kept in filthy rabbit hutches with no shade and swarming with flies, or barn stalls knee deep in feces. 1 Love’s leadership is known for their work with puppy mill dogs (Bill Smith’s appearances on Oprah and his undercover puppy mill investigation with Lisa Ling was seen by 49M viewers around the world and established his team as the foremost rescuers of puppy mill dogs in PA). No other organization in PA saved more mill dogs than 1 Love 4 Animals in 2019. And our success depended entirely on the dedication of our volunteers and the generosity of our donors. Every dog rescued needed to be groomed, vaccinated, spay/neutered, and treated for periodontal disease before being placed in loving and carefully screened homes.


 
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The definition of a puppy mill? Any facility that places profit over the welfare of the breeding dogs in their kennel. 1 Love volunteers have rescued dogs from breeders with over a thousand dogs in their barns, and small operations with six or fewer breeding females living in rabbit hutches. Recently, our volunteers arrived at a farm in Lancaster County, PA to find a breeder digging a hole beside a dog that was very much alive. The dog had been hit by a car and he refused to spend money on her vet care (thanks to Penn Vet, the dog will make a complete recovery). The Bulldogs typically have scars from a dozen Caesarians. Mats the size of saucers tear and rip the Poodles’ skin and one blind Labrador with three-inch nails lived on stretched chicken wire for eight years.

The number of dogs we rescue from these places depends entirely on the amount of money we can raise. Because every dog freed is in need: spaying or neutering, vaccinations, grooming, and dental cleaning (older mill dogs often suffer from periodontal disease). Below are just a small sample of the happy/lucky dogs we rescued, vetted, and placed in homes this summer.

 
Amish boy gives up a female Havanese after the dog’s puppies were stillborn. Many breeders in Lancaster County cannot justify keeping (or feeding) dogs that can no longer produce sellable puppies. Center: A recently rescued Bulldog walks on grass for the first time, after being confined to a stacked cage in a dark barn for eight years.

Amish boy gives up a female Havanese after the dog’s puppies were stillborn. Many breeders in Lancaster County cannot justify keeping (or feeding) dogs that can no longer produce sellable puppies. Center: A recently rescued Bulldog walks on grass for the first time, after being confined to a stacked cage in a dark barn for eight years.

Happy bulldog after being rescued from an Amish puppy mill.

The dog we named “Clara” came to 1 Love with long nails and thousands of fleas. We soon discovered she was also blind – a genetic condition our vet believes was likely passed on to her dozens of puppies – then sold to unsuspecting families online and in pet stores.

The dog we named “Clara” came to 1 Love with long nails and thousands of fleas. We soon discovered she was also blind – a genetic condition our vet believes was likely passed on to her dozens of puppies – then sold to unsuspecting families online and in pet stores.